Archive for June, 2013

Thingiverse remix graph: visualizing the net of physical things

I recently became a happy owner of a Solidoodle 2 3D printer. This has been the start of a beautiful addiction, but more on the hardware hacking aspects in another post.

If you haven’t heard of it before, 3D printing refers to a family of manufacturing methods, originally developed for rapid prototyping, the first of which appeared almost three decades ago. Much like mainframe computers in the 1960s, professional 3D printers cost up to hundred thousands of dollars. Starting with the RepRap project a few years ago, home 3D printers are now becoming available, in the few hundred to a couple of thousand dollar price range.  For now, these are targeted mostly to tinkerers, much closer to an Altair or, at best, an Apple II, than a MacBook. Despite the hype that currently surrounds 3D printing, empowering average users to turn bits into atoms (and vice versa) will likely have profound effects, similar to those witnessed when content (music, news, books, etc) went digital, as Chris Anderson eloquently argues with his usual, captivating dramatic flair. Personally, I’m similarly excited about this as I was about “big data” (for lack of a better term) around 2006 and mobile around 2008, so I’ll take this as a good sign. :)

One of the key challenges, however, is finding things to print!  This is crucial for 3D printing to really take off. Learning CAD software and successfully designing 3D objects takes substantial, time, effort, and skill. Affordable 3D scanners (like the ones from MatterformCADscan, and Makerbot) are beginning to appear. However, the most common way to find things is via online sharing of designs. Thingiverse is the most popular online community for “thing” sharing. Thingiverse items are freely available (usually under Creative Commons licenses), but there is also commercial potential: companies like Shapeways offer both manufacturing (using industrial 3D printers and manual post-processing) and marketing services for “thing” designs.

I’ve become a huge fan of Thingiverse.  You can check out my own user profile to find things that I’ve designed myself, or things that I’ve virtually “collected” because I thought they were really cool or useful (or both). Thingiverse is run by MakerBot, which manufactures and sells 3D printers, and needs to help people find things to print. It’s a social networking site centered around “thing” designs. Consequently, the main entities are people (users) and things, and links/relationships revolve around people creating things, people liking things, people downloading and making things, people virtually collecting things, and so on. Other than people-thing relationships, links can also represent people following other people (a-la Twitter or Facebook), and things remixing other things (more on this soon). Each thing also has a number of associated files (polygon meshes for 3D printing, vector paths for lasercutting, original CAD files—anything that’s needed to make the thing).

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Adventures in fiberglassing: custom fabricated tweeter pods

[This project is more than a year old, but I never got around to posting anything earlier.]

I generally like to make things (I used to say “build” things, but that was misconstrued by some manager/academic types, who apparently have a very different definition of “to build”), whether it’s software, writing, or “hardware”.  I usually talk about the first, but I occasionally do the last (much to the dismay of my wife, who has nonetheless been very patient! :).  I also like to try new things–I probably care more about the process and experimentation, learning what’s possible and how to do it, that the final product (which is not to say that I don’t care about the final product at all, but it get’s boring pretty quickly for me). So, sometime last year I decided to upgrade my car speakers (I also Dynamat-ted all doors, but I didn’t take photos of that adventure; one tip, though:: make sure you sit down properly, because after crouching down on tiptoe for almost an entire day, I needed physiotherapy for my heel tendon :) —now my Subaru’s doors sound like a Mercedes when you shut them). However, the new tweeters were much larger than the factory-installed ones, so I took the opportunity (excuse?) to learn fiberglassing and make new tweeter pods.

Let me set the mood by starting with my outfit: I started with the one on the left, but after plenty of PVC dust, fiberglass dust, and acetone fumes, I upgraded to the one on the right. A proper respirator helps a lot, especially if you’re working indoors. And don’t skip the safety glasses (even if you’re wearing vision glasses, as I found out).  Always take the proper safety precautions.

outfit0 outfit

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Expectations of privacy

I have stopped worrying what can be inferred about me, because I’ve accepted the simple fact that, given enough time (data) and resources, anything can be inferred. Consider, as an example, “location privacy.”  A number of approaches rely on adaptively coarsening the detail of reported location (using all sorts of criteria to decide detail, from mobility patterns, to spatial query workload characteristics, etc).  For example, instead of revealing my exact location, I can reveal my location at a city-block level. In an area like NYC, this would conflate me with hundreds of other people that happen to be on the same block, but a block-level location is still accurate enough to be useful (e.g., for finding nearby shops and restaurants).  This might work if I’m reporting my location just once.  However, if I travel from home to work, then my trajectory over a few days, even at a city-block granularity, is likely sufficient to distinguish me from other people.  I could perhaps counter this by revealing my location at a city-level or state-level.  Then a few days worth of data might not be enough to identify me.  However, I often travel and data over a period of, say, a year, would likely be enough to identify me even if location detail is quite coarse.  Of course, I could take things to the extreme and just reveal that “I am on planet Earth”.  But that’s the same as not publishing my location, since this fact is true for everyone.

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