Mobile OCR input: “Fully automatic” and reality

Recently I’ve been toying around with WordSnap OCR (project page, source code, app on Android Market), an app for OCR-based camera input on Android. In the process, I found out a few things about “smart” versus “fast”.

At least in data mining, “fully automatic” is an often unquestioned holy grail.  There are certainly several valid reasons for this, such as if you’re trying to scan huge collections of books such as this, or index images from your daily life like this.  In this case, you use all the available processing power to make as few errors as possible (i.e., maximize accuracy).

However, if the user is sitting right in front of your program, watching your algorithms and their output, things are a little different. No matter how smart your algorithm is, some errors will occur. This tends to annoy users. In that sense, actively involved users are a liability. However, they can also be an asset: since they’re sitting there anyway, waiting for results, you may as well get them really involved. If you have cheap but intelligent labor ready and willing, use it! The results will be better or, at the very least, no worse.  Also, users tend to remember the failures. So, even if end results were similar on average, allowing users to correct failures as early as possible will make them happier.

Instead of making algorithms as smart as possible, the goal now is to make them as fast as possible, so that they produce near-realtime results that don’t have to be perfect; they just shouldn’t be total garbage. When I started playing with the idea for WordSnap, I was thinking how to make the algorithms as smart as possible.  However, for the reasons above, I soon changed tactics.

The rest of this post describes some of the successful design decisions but,  more importantly, the failures in the balance between “automatic” and “realtime guidance”. The story begins with the following example image:

Original image

Incidentally, this image was the inspiration for WordSnap: I wanted to look up “inimical” but I was too lazy to type. Also, for the record, WordSnap uses camera preview frames, which are semi-planar YUV data at HVGA resolution (480×320). This image is a downsampled (512×384) full-resolution photograph taken with the G1 camera (2048×1536); most experiments here were performed before WordSnap existed in any usable form. Finally, I should point out that OCR isn’t really my area; what I describe below is based on common sense rather than knowledge of prior art, although just before writing this post I did try a quick review of the literature.

Read the rest of this entry »

Comments (13)

Randy Pausch in CACM

The September issue of CACM has a one-page, seven-question interview with Randy Pausch. It is definitely worth reading, so I’ll give you a sneak peek (unfortunately, CACM is not “open access”):

What about advice for CS teachers and professors?

That it’s time for us to start being more honest with ourselves about what our field is and how we should approach teaching it. Personally, I think that if we had named the field “Information Engineering” as opposed to “Computer Science,” we would have had a better culture for the discipline. For example, CS departments are notorious for not instilling concepts like testing and validation the way many other engineering disciplines do.

Is there anything you wish someone had told you before you began your own studies?

Just that being technically strong is only one aspect of an education.

[…]

Alice has proven phenomenally successful at teaching young women, in particular, to program. What else should we be doing to get more women engaged in computer science?

Well, it’s important to note that Alice works for both women and men. I think female-specific “approaches” can be dangerous for lots of reasons, but approaches like Alice, which focus on activities like storytelling, work across gender, age, and cultural background. It’s something very fundamental to want to tell stories. And Caitlin Kelleher’s dissertation did a fantastic job of showing just how powerful that approach is.

The interview was conducted a few weeks before his death. I’ll just say that, somehow, I suspect someone not in his position would never have said at least one of these things.  It’s a sad thought, but Randy’s message is, as always, positive.

Comments

“Beyond Relational Databases”

The article “Beyond Relational Databases” by Margo Seltzer in the July 2008 issue of CACM claims that “there is more to data access than SQL.”  Although this is a fairly obvious statement, the article is well-written and worth a read.  The main message is simple: bundling data storage, indexing, query execution, transaction control, and logging components into a monolithic system and wrapping them with a veneer of SQL is not the best solution to all data management problems. Consequently, the author makes a call for solutions based on a modular approach, using open components.

However, the article offers no concrete examples at all, so I’ll venture a suggestion. In a growing open source ecosystem of scalable, fault-tolerant, distributed data processing and management components, MapReduce is emerging as a predominant elementary abstraction for distributed execution of a large class of data-intensive processing tasks. It has attracted a lot of attention, proving both a source for inspiration, as well as target of polemic by prominent database researchers.

In database terminology, MapReduce is an execution engine, largely unconcerned about data models and storage schemes.  In the simplest case, data reside on a distributed file system (e.g., GFS, HDFS, or KFS) but nothing prevents pulling data from a large data store like BigTable (or HBase, or Hypertable), or any other storage engine, as long as it

  • Provides data de-clustering and replication across many machines, and
  • Allows computations to execute on local copies of the data.

Arguably, MapReduce is powerful both for the features it provides, as well as for the features it omits, in order to provide a clean and simple programming abstraction, which facilitates improved usability, efficiency and fault-tolerance.

Most of the fundamental ideas for distributed data processing are not new.  For example, a researcher involved in some of the projects mentioned once said, with notable openness and directness, that “people think there is something new in all this; there isn’t, it’s all Gamma“—and he’s probably right.  Reading the original Google papers, none make a claim to fundamental discoveries.  Focusing on “academic novelty” (whatever that may mean) is irrelevant.  Similarly, most of the other criticisms in the irresponsibly written and oft (mis)quoted blog post and its followup miss the point.  The big thing about the technologies mentioned in this post is, in fact, their promise to materialize Margo Seltzer’s vision, on clusters of commodity hardware.

Michael Stonebraker and David DeWitt do have a valid point: we should not fixate on MapReduce; greater things are happening. So, if we are indeed witnessing the emergence of an open ecosystem for scalable, distributed data processing, what might be the other key components?

Data types: In database speak, these are known as “schemas.” Google’s protocol buffers the underlying API for data storage and exchange.  This is also nothing radically new; in essence, it is a binary XML representation,  somewhere between the simple XTalk protocol which underpins Vinci and the WBXML tokenized representation (both slightly predating protocol buffers and both now largely defunct).  In fact, if I had to name a major weakness in the open source versions of Google’s infrastructure (Hadoop, HBase, etc), it would be the lack of such a common data representation format.  Hadoop has Writable, but that is much too low-level (a data-agnostic, minimalistic abstraction for lightweight, mutable, serializable objects), leading to replication of effort in many projects that rely on Hadoop (such as Nutch, Pig, Cascading, and so on).  Interestingly, the rcc record compiler component (which seems to have fallen in disuse) was once called Jute with possibly plans grander than what came to be.  So, I was pleasantly surprised when Google decided to open-source protocol buffers a few days ago—although it may now turn out to be too little too late.

Data access: In the beginning there was BigTable, which has been recently followed by HBase and Hypertable.  It started fairly simple, as a “is a sparse, distributed, persistent multidimensional sorted map” to quote the original paper.  It is now part of the Google App Engine and even has support for general transactions. HBase, at least as of version 0.1 was relatively immature, but there is a flurry of development and we should expect good things pretty soon, given the Hadoop team’s excellent track record so far.  While writing this post, I remembered an HBase wish list item which, although lower priority, I had found interesting: support for scripting languages, instead of HQL. Turns out this has already been done (JIRA entry and wiki entries).  I am a fan of modern scripting languages and generally skeptical about new special-purpose languages (which is not to say that they don’t have their place).

Job and schema management: Pig, from the database community, is described as a parallel dataflow engine and employs yet another special-purpose language which tries to look a little like SQL (but it is no secret that it isn’t). Cascading has received no attention in the research community, but it merits a closer look. It is based on a “build system” metaphor, aiminig to be the equivalent of Make or Ant for distributed processing of huge datasets.  Instead of introducing a new language, it provides a clean Java API and also integrates with scripting languages that support functional programming (at the moment, Groovy).  As I have used neither Cascading nor Pig at the moment, I will reserve any further comparisons.  It is worth noting that both projects build upon Hadoop core and do not integrate, at the moment, with other components, such as HBase. Finally, Sawzall deserves an honorable mention, but I won’t discuss it further as it is a closed technology.

Indexing: Beyond lookups based on row keys in BigTable, general support for indexing is a relatively open topic.  I suspect that IR-style indices, such as Lucene, have much to offer (something that has not gone unnoticed)—more on this in another post.

A number of other projects are also worth keeping an eye on, such as CouchDB, Amazon’s S3, Facebook’s Hive, and JAQL (and I’m sure I’m missing many more).  All of them are, of course, open source.

Comments (2)

The Fall of CAPTCHAs – really?

I recently saw a Slashdot post dramatically titled “Fallout From the Fall of CAPTCHAs“, citing an equally dramatic article about “How CAPTCHA got trashed“.  Am I missing something? Ignoring their name for a moment, CAPTCHAs are computer programs, following specific rules, and therefore they are subject to the same cat-and-mouse games that all security mechanisms go through. Where exactly is the surprise? So Google’s or Yahoo’s current versions were cracked.  They’ll soon come up with new tricks, and still newer ones after those are cracked, and so on.

In fact, I was always confused about one aspect of CAPTCHAs. I thought that a Turing test is, by definition, administered by a human, so a “completely-automated Turing-test” is an oxymoron, something like a “liberal conservative”. An unbreakable authentication system based on Turing tests should rely fully on human computation: humans should also be at the end that generates the tests. Let humans come up with questions, using references to images, web site content, and whatever else they can think of.  Then match these to other humans who can gain access to a web service by solving the riddles. Perhaps the tests should also be somehow rated, lest the simple act of logging in turns into an absurd treasure hunt. I’m not exactly sure if and how this could be turned into an addictive game, but I’ll leave that to the experts.  The idea is too obvious to miss anyway.

CAPTCHAs, even in their current form, have led to numerous contributions.  A non-exclusive list, in no particular order:

  1. They have a catchy name. That counts a lot. Seriously. I’m not joking; if you don’t believe me, repeat out loud after me: “I have no idea what ‘onomatopoeia’ is—I’d better MSN-Live it” or “… I’d better Yahoo it.”  Doesn’t quite work, does it?
  2. They popularized an idea which, even if not entirely new, was made accesible to webmasters the world over, and is now used daily by thousands if not millions of people.  What greater measure of success can you think of for a technology?
  3. Sowed the seeds for Luis von Ahn’s viral talk on human computation, which has featured in countless universities, companies and conferences.  Although not professionally designed, the slides’ simplicity matches their content in a Jobs-esque way. As for delivery and timing, Steve might even learn something from this talk (although, in fairness, Steve Jobs probably doesn’t get the chance to introduce the same product hundreds of times).

So is anyone really surprised that the race for smarter tests and authentication mechanisms has not ended, and probably never will? (Incidentally, the lecture video above is from 2006, over three years after the first CAPTCHAs were succesfully broken by another computer program—see also CVPR 2003 paper—.  There are no silver bullets, no technology is perfect, but some are really useful. Perhaps CAPTCHAs are, to some extent, victim of their own hype which, however, is instrumental and perhaps even necessary for the wide adoption of any useful technology.  I’m pretty sure we’ll see more elaborate tests soon, not less.

Comments

Data Mining: “I’m feeling lucky” ?

In an informal presentation on MapReduce that I recently gave, I included the following graphic, to summarize the “holy grail” of systems vs. mining:

Systems vs. Data mining

This was originally inspired by a quote that I read sometime ago:

Search is more about systems software than algorithms or relevance tricks.

How often do you click the “lucky” button, instead of “search”? Incidentally, I would be very interested in finding some hard numbers on this (I couldn’t)—but that button must exist for good reason, so a number of people must be using it. Anyway, I believe it’s a safe assumption that “search” gets clicked more often than “lucky” by most people. And when you click “search”, you almost always expect to get something relevant, even if not perfectly so.

In machine learning or data mining, the holy grail is to invent algorithms that “learn from the data” or that “discover the golden nugget of information in the massive rubble of data”. But how often have you taken a random learning algorithm, fed it a random dataset, and expected to get something useful. I’d venture a guess: not very often.

So it doesn’t quite work that way. The usefulness of the results is a function of both the data and the algorithm. That’s common sense: drawing any kind of inference involves both (i) making the right observations, and (ii) using them in the right way. I would argue that in most succesful applications, it’s the data takes center stage, rather than the algorithms. Furthermore, mining aims to develop the analytic algorithms, but systems development is what enables running those algorithms on the appropriate and, often, massive data sets. So, I do not see how the former makes sense without the latter. In research however, we sometimes forget this, and simply pick our favorite hammer and clumsily wield it in the air, ignoring both (i) the data collection and pre-processing step, and (ii) the systems side.

It may be that “I’m feeling lucky” often hits the target (try it, you may be surprised). However, in machine learning and mining research, we sometimes shoot the arrow first, and paint the bullseye around it. There are many reasons for this, but perhaps one stands out. A well-known European academic (from way up north) once said that his government’s funding agency once criticized him for succeeding too often. Now, that’s something rare!

Comments